Google Docs Editors Alternatives

Best Free and Open Source Alternatives to Google Docs Editors

Google has a firm grip on the desktop. Their products and services are ubiquitous. Don’t get us wrong, we’re long-standing admirers of many of Google’s products and services. They are often high quality, easy to use, and ‘free’, but there can be downsides of over-reliance on a specific company. For example, there are concerns about their privacy policies, business practices, and an almost insatiable desire to control all of our data, all of the time.

What if you are looking to move away from Google and embark on a new world of online freedom, where you are not constantly tracked, monetised and attached to Google’s ecosystem.

In this series, we explore how you can migrate from Google without missing out on anything. We’ll recommend open source solutions.

Google Docs Editors Google Docs Editors is a web-based productivity office suite within Google Drive service. The suite includes Google Docs, Google Sheets, Google Slides, Google Drawings, Google Forms, Google Sites, and Google Keep.

Each Google Account includes 15 GB of storage, which is shared across Gmail, Google Drive and Google Photos.

When it comes to open source open source office suites our strongest recommendation goes to LibreOffice. It’s true that LibreOffice lacks the collaborative editing offered by Google Docs Editors although there are plans to add this functionality. And it obviously doesn’t provide online storage. But we explored open source alternatives to Google Drive in a previous article. We recommend hosting NextCloud on your own server, or you can use a cloud provider.

Linux for Starters - LibreOffice Writer
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LibreOffice has native support for a modern and open standard, the Open Document Format (ODF). ODF 1.3’s most important new features are document digital signatures and OpenPGP-based XML document encryption. The new ODF also boasts improvements in change tracking, and elements first pages, text, numbers, and charts.

An alternative to LibreOffice is Apache OpenOffice. It’s also an open source software suite for word processing, spreadsheets, presentations, graphics, databases and more.

There are collaborative online open source office suites available, but with restrictions such as limits on the number of simultaneous connections and number of users.


All articles in this series:

Alternatives to Google's Products and Services
Google MailGmail is a hugely popular email service.
Google MapsMaps is a web mapping service offering satellite imagery, aerial photography, and more.
Google PhotosPhotos stores your images in the cloud for convenient access from anywhere.
Google TranslateTranslate is a multilingual neural machine translation service.
Google CalendarCalendar helps manage your busy life with a digital calendar.
Google ChromeChrome is application software for accessing the World Wide Web.
Google SearchSearch looks at privacy-focused alternatives to Google Search.
Google DriveDrive is a file storage and synchronization service.
Google Earth ProEarth Pro maps Earth by superimposing satellite images, aerial photography, and GIS.
Google DNSDNS resolves a particular domain name to its IP equivalent.
Google YouTubeYouTube is an online video sharing and social media platform.
Google DocsGoogle Docs is a web-based productivity office suite.

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5 comments

    1. Actually it’s pretty easy. One of the failings of many open source project is inadequate documentation. But NextCloud has good and clear documentation. Self-hosting is definitely preferable to trusting your data to unknown companies!

  1. I try to avoid Google’s products given the disclosure about their data harvesting. I switched away from their search engine, removed Chrome, deleted my Gmail account. There’s probably more to do before I’ve stopped Google collecting data on what I’m doing. Or is this even possible?

    1. Google knows your name, your face, your birthday, gender, other email addresses you use, your password and phone number. They probably know your shoe size, inside leg, and even your measurements from an orchidometer. And they won’t be forgetting this information even if you stop using their products and service. Best to face facts, they own you.

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