Spacemacs – configuration framework for Emacs

Spacemacs is an extensible and customizable text editor, built on top of Emacs and using Vim keybindings. The goal of the project is to combine both Vim and Emacs editors, getting the best parts from each. Spacemacs was initially intended to be used by Vim users who want to go to the next level by using Emacs. But it’s perfectly usable by non Vim users by choosing the emacs editing style.

Spacemacs is billed as a new way to experience Emacs — a sophisticated and polished set-up focused on ergonomics, mnemonics and consistency.

Spacemacs can be used naturally by both Emacs and Vim users — you can even mix the two editing styles. Switching easily between input styles makes Spacemacs a great tool for pair-programming.

Spacemacs can also be launched in a daemon mode.

Spacemacs requires Emacs 24.4 or above.

Features include:

  • Great documentation: access documentation in Emacs. There’s a great built-in tutorial.
  • Beautiful GUI: distraction free UI and functional mode-line.
  • Excellent ergonomics: all the key bindings are accessible by pressing the space bar or alt-m.
  • Integrate nicely with Evil states (Vim modes).
  • Fast boot time: packages and configuration are lazy-loaded as much as possible.
  • Mnemonic key bindings: commands have mnemonic prefixes like SPC b for all the buffer commands or SPC p for the project commands.
  • Batteries included: discover hundreds of ready-to-use packages nicely organised in configuration layers following a set of conventions.
  • Major difference between Spacemacs and regular text editor is states. Each state changes the way how the editor works.
  • Two options for file navigation: inline navigation and built-in file manager. Inline navigation is used in Spacemacs confirmation dialogs and it’s very similar to the shell one. Build-in file manager is more user-friendly and allows you to check the file details.
  • Layers – a set of packages and configuration options that greatly extends editor functionality in some way. There are layers for different programming languages, for example, or layers, providing additional tools (like IRC messaging, or integrated web browser). Some layers are already shipped with Spacemacs, the others can be added manually.
  • Good file navigation with Neotree and Ranger.

Website: www.spacemacs.org
Support: GitHub Code Repository
Developer: Sylvain Benner and many contributors
License: GNU General Public License Version 3

Spacemacs

Spacemacs is written in Emacs Lisp. Learn Lisp with our recommended free books and free tutorials.

Return to Configuration Frameworks for Emacs Home Page


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