Xmonad – dynamically tiling X11 window manager

Xmonad is a minimalist, tiling window manager for X, written in the functional programming language Haskell. Windows are managed using automatic layout algorithms, which can be dynamically reconfigured. At any time windows are arranged so as to maximise the use of screen real estate.

All features of the window manager are accessible purely from the keyboard: a mouse is entirely optional.

Xmonad is configured in Haskell, and custom layout algorithms may be implemented by the user in config files. A principle of Xmonad is predictability: the user should know in advance precisely the window arrangement that will result from any action.

Features include:

  • Very stable, fast, small and simple.
  • Automates the common task of arranging windows, so you can concentrate on getting tasks completed.
  • First class keyboard support: a mouse is unnecessary.
  • Minimalistic – no window decorations, no status bar, no icon dock.
  • Stable.
  • Extensible.
  • Per-screen workspaces.
  • Xinerama support for multihead displays.
  • Managehooks.
  • Tiling reflection.
  • State preservation.
  • Layout mirroring.
  • Full support for floating, tabbing and decorated windows.
  • Full support for GNOME and KDE utilities.
  • Per-workspace layout algorithms.
  • Per-screens custom status bars.
  • Compositing support.
  • Powerful, stable customisation and on-the-fly reconfiguration.
  • Large extension library.
  • Locale support.

Website: xmonad.org
Support: Documentation
Developer: Spencer Janssen, Don Stewart, Jason Creighton and many contributors
License: BSD-3

Xmonad

Xmonad is written in Haskell. Learn Haskell with our recommended free books and free tutorials.

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