5 Best Free Linux Typing Tutors

Being able to touch type is the ability of typing without looking at the keyboard. When touch-typing, the individual uses all fingers instead of just a few fingers. Consequently, typing speed increases dramatically.

It’s not only transcriptionists and secretaries that benefit from being able to type without looking at the keyboard. By concentrating on their thoughts and creative processes rather than the keyboard, all users will focus more on the content of the text, thereby increasing its quality. Moreover, touch-typing is less tiring, and less demanding on the brain. It also reduces the risk of Repetitive strain injury and Carpal tunnel syndrome.

Typing tutor software teaches fast and accurate typing through a system of informative lessons and progress tracking. We think it is important that learning should be fun, so we have included some typing games in this feature.

To provide an insight into the quality of software available, we have compiled a list of 5 excellent typing tutors. Hopefully there will be something of interest for anyone looking to improve their typing skills. Here’s our verdict on the software.

Typing-Tutors-Best-Free-Software

Now, let’s explore the 5 typing tutors at hand. For each title we have compiled its own portal page, providing a screenshot of the software in action, a full description with an in-depth analysis of its features, together with links to relevant resources.

Typing Tutors
TIPP10 10-finger intelligent touch typing tutor with different keyboard layouts
KlavaroVery flexible and efficient touch typing tutor
KTouchTouch typing tutor for KDE
GNU TypistSimple ncurses touch typing tutor
Tux TypingEducational typing tutor game starring Tux

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Read our complete collection of recommended free and open source software. The collection covers all categories of software.

The software collection forms part of our series of informative articles for Linux enthusiasts. There's tons of in-depth reviews, alternatives to Google, fun things to try, hardware, free programming books and tutorials, and much more.
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4 comments

  1. Thanks for this list! I looked through the descriptions of the 5 programs, installed them and settled for GNU Typist. I am not sure I would have found this gem without you.

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