Generic Mapping Tools – scriptable command-line oriented package

GMT is an open source collection of tools that allow users to manipulate (x,y) and (x,y,z) data sets (including filtering, trend fitting, gridding, projecting, etc.) and produce Encapsulated PostScript File (EPS) illustrations ranging from simple x-y plots through contour maps to artificially illuminated surfaces and 3-D perspective views in black and white, gray tone, hachure patterns, and 24-bit colour.

The software comes with a comprehensive collection of free GIS data, such as coast lines, rivers, political borders and coordinates of other geographic objects.

This is a command-line set of utilities. However, there are graphical user interfaces available (such as iGMT, Mirone,and SEATREE) from third party developers.

Features include:

  • Over 80 tools for manipulating geographic and Cartesian data sets (including filtering, trend fitting, gridding, projecting, etc.) and producing PostScript illustrations ranging from simple x–y plots via contour maps to artificially illuminated surfaces and 3D perspective views.
  • 40 more specialized and discipline-specific tools.
  • Support for approximately 30 common map projections and transformations such as GSHHG coastlines, rivers, and political boundaries and optionally DCW country polygons.
  • Support for linear, log10, and power scaling

Website: www.generic-mapping-tools.org
Support: Documentation, Mailing Lists
Developer: Paul Wessel, Walter H.F. Smith and contributors
License: GNU Lesser General Public License version 3 or any later version.

Generic Mapping Tools

GMT is written in C and C++. Learn C with our recommended free books and free tutorials. Learn C++ with our recommended free books and free tutorials.

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