Bazaar – version control system

Bazaar is a decentralized version control system designed to be easy to use and intuitive, able to adapt to many workflows, reliable, and easily extendable.

Publishing of branches can be done over plain HTTP, that is, no special software is needed on the server to host Bazaar branches. Branches can be pushed to the server via sftp (which most SSH installations come with), FTP, or over a custom and faster protocol if bzr is installed in the remote end.

Merging in Bazaar is easy, as the implementation is able to avoid many spurious conflicts, deals well with repeated merges between branches, and is able to handle modifications to renamed files correctly.

Bazaar has a flexible plugin interface which can be used to extend its functionality. Many plugins exist, providing useful commands (bzrtools), graphical interfaces (bzr-gtk), or native interaction with Subversion branches (bzr-svn).

Features include:

  • Supports working with or without a central server.
  • Easy to use and intuitive:
    • Only five commands are needed to do all basic operations.
    • Commands have documentation accessible via ‘bzr help command’.
  • Robust and reliable:
    • Developed under an extensive test suite.
  • Publish branches with HTTP:
    • Branches can be hosted on an HTTP server with no need for special software on the server side.
    • Branches can be uploaded by bzr itself over SSH (SFTP), or with rsync.
  • Easily extended and customized.
  • Smart Merging:
    • Merge knows and merges only what’s missing.
    • Merge minimizes spurious conflicts.
    • Merge is not tricked by identical changes.
  • Intuitive:
    • Manage branches with OS commands too — including rm, cp and mv.
    • Branch anything by committing in any downloaded branch.
    • Aliases for CVS and SVN users allow for easy migration.
  • Powerful:
    • Tracks renames of both files and directories.
    • Uncommit.
    • Branches are removable.
  • Direct support for URLs – one command can checkout or merge from remote locations.
  • Integrated GPG support – zero setup for most signed archive situations.
  • Explicit tracking of conflicts, preventing accidental commits of files with conflicts single merge command that allows merging between arbitrary branches.
  • Annotate support.
  • Designed as a Python API with a plugin system.
  • Embeddable.
  • Supports file names from the complete Unicode set.
  • Python bindings.
  • Works with other revision control systems, permitting users to branch from another system, make local changes and commit them into a Bazaar branch.

Website: bazaar.canonical.com
Support: Documentation
Developer: Open CASCADE S.A.S.
License: GNU LGPL 2.1

Bazaar is written in Python. Learn Python with our recommended free books and free tutorials.

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