Tomahawk – music player

The developers of Tomahawk bill their application as a music player that fundamentally changes the way music is consumed and shared. This application hooks you up with your friends — connect with your Jabber /Google Talk / Twitter friends and share collections and playlists.

Tomahawk makes use of ‘resolvers’ – small scripts that let users use a variety of services, such as hooking up your Google / Jabber account so that you can play music from other people’s libraries.

This application is written in Qt.

Features include:

  • Dashboard.
  • SuperCollection.
  • Top Loved Tracks.
  • Charts – shows top music charts from iTunes, WeAreHunted, Ex.fm, Billboard, and more.
  • New Releases.
  • Collections.
  • Loved Tracks – instantly add songs to your Loved Tracks.
  • Playlists .
  • Smart Playlists using the Echo Nest Service, Tomahawk can automatically create playlists from an artist name, genre, key, adjective, tempo, and more.
  • Import XSPF (XML Shareable Playlist Format).
  • Export playlists.
  • Supports the following services:
    • Local network.
    • YouTube – search YouTube for audio content.
    • Jabber – log on to your Jabber/XMPP account to connect to your friends.
    • Ex.fm – searches this service for tracks.
    • Last.fm scrobbling.
    • Ampache – connect to an Ampache server and resolves tracks.
    • Subsonic – searches a Subsonic service for music to play.
    • Official.fm – search this service for tracks.
    • 4Shared – looks for tracks to play from this service.
    • SoundCloud.
    • Jamendo – search this free music database.
    • Dilandau – uses this mp3 search engine to find tracks.
    • Grooveshark – searches Grooveshark for playable tracks (requires premium account).
    • Spotify – play your music from and sync your playlists with Spotify (requires premium account).
    • Google – connect to Google Talk to find your friends.
    • Twitter – connect to your Twitter followers.
  • Add custom radio stations.
  • Support for SOCKS proxy.
  • Remote Peer Connection Methods.

Website: github.com/tomahawk-player/tomahawk
Support: Wiki
Developer: Christian Muehlhaeuser and contributors
License: GNU GPL v3

Tomahawk

Tomahawk is written in C++. Learn C++ with our recommended free books and free tutorials.

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