Digital Universe Atlas – open source planetarium software

The Digital Universe Atlas, developed by the American Museum of Natural History’s Hayden Planetarium with support from NASA, incorporates data from dozens of organizations worldwide to create the most complete and accurate 3D atlas of the Universe from the local solar neighborhood out to the edge of the observable Universe.

Digital Universe Atlas is a standalone 4-dimensional space visualization application built on the programmable Partiview data visualization engine.

Explore the nearby stars, star clusters, nebulae, extrasolar planets, nearby galaxy clusters, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and much more. See the night sky as it appears across the spectrum, from radio and infrared, to visible, and even in Gamma rays.

Digital Universe shares the capacity to visualize space from points outside Earth. Building on work by Japan’s RIKEN, its planet renderings and zoom visualizations can match or exceed Celestia.

Features include:

  • Extremely powerful visualization engine.
  • High quality planet rendering.
  • Zoom visualizations.
  • Built on Partiview.
  • An industrial strength, interactive, mono- or stereoscopic viewer for 4-dimensional datasets.
  • Highly accurate visualization from distances beyond the Milky Way galaxy is integral to the softwar.

Website: www.amnh.org/research/hayden-planetarium/digital-universe/download
Support: Help
Developer: American Museum of Natural History’s Hayden Planetarium, National Aeronautics and Space Administration
License: Illinois Open Source License

The Digital Universe Atlas has spun off a commercial-grade planetarium platform from SCISS called Uniview.

Digital Universe Atlas

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