TORCS – The Open Racing Car Simulator

TORCS (The Open Racing Car Simulator) is a highly portable multi platform car racing simulator. It allows you to drive in races against opponents simulated by the computer.

You can also develop your own computer-controlled driver (also called a robot) in C or C++.

TORCS is designed to enable pre-programmed AI drivers to race against one another, while allowing the user to control a vehicle using either a keyboard, mouse, or wheel input. The concept is derived from RARS (the Robot Auto Racing Simulator).

The game offers a wide variety of real-life high-performance vehicles as well as Formula 1 racers and off-road rally racers.

Features include:

  • 3D Car racing simulation for gamers, researchers, engineers and teachers.
  • 50 different cars.
  • More than 20 tracks.
  • 50 opponents to race against.
  • Sophisticated physical model.
  • Graphic features lighting, smoke, skidmarks and glowing
    brake disks.
  • Simulation offers:
    • Simple damage model.
    • Collisions.
    • Tire and wheel properties (springs, dampers, stiffness,
      …).
    • Aerodynamics (ground effect, spoilers, …).
  • Supports all input devices (steering wheels, joystick, game pads).
  • Lots of community content/add-on software available.
  • Easy to modify.
  • Modular architecture.
  • Cross-platform game – runs on Linux (x86, AMD64 and PPC), FreeBSD, OpenSolaris, MacOSX and Windows operating systems.

Website: torcs.sourceforge.net
Support: FAQ, Mailing List
Developer: Eric Espié and Christophe Guionneau and other contributors
License: Freely distributable

TORCS

TORCS is written in C++ and C. Learn C++ with our recommended free books and free tutorials. Learn C with our recommended free books and free tutorials.

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