LinuxLinks.com
Newbies What Next ? News Forums Calendar

Search





News Sections
Home
General News (3987/0)
Reviews (636/0)
Press Releases (465/0)
Distributions (197/0)
Software (907/0)
Hardware (537/0)
Security (192/0)
Tutorials (356/0)
Off Topic (181/0)


User Functions
Username:

Password:

Don't have an account yet? Sign up as a New User


Events
There are no upcoming events




Making Linux More Accessible

Making Linux More Accessible

A startling fact is that there are in excess of a billion people who have some type of disability. That represents approximately 15% of the world's population with a physical, sensory or mental limitation that interferes with their ability to move, see, hear or learn. 350 million people in the world are partially sighted or blind. The faster computer technology evolves, the more excluded these individuals would become without development in computer software that seeks to address their needs.

Accessibility is the degree to which products, devices, services, or environments are available to as many people as possible whatever their circumstances. Accessibility can be viewed as the ability to access and benefit from a system or entity. Accessibility is paramount. Social inclusion is not an act of charity but a fundamental human right.

We have witnessed Linux software and distributions that have made strides to help make everyone socially inclusive. For example, the GNOME Accessibility Project develops open source accessibility solutions for graphical user interfaces. Ubuntu has an Accessibility Team that aims to make Ubuntu usable by a broad a spectrum of people as possible. Special mention should also go to the Vinux Project, which is a Ubuntu derived distribution optimised for the needs of blind and partially sighted users.

There are also lots of individual software applications that offer different accessibility features. This article seeks to identify some of the finest open source software that is available that helps to enable individuals make full use of computer-based technology whatever their physical or sensory abilities.

So let's explore the 8 universal access tools at hand. For each application we have compiled its own portal page, a full description with an in-depth analysis of its features, a screenshot, together with links to relevant resources and reviews.

Universal Access
Easystroke Gesture recognition program
Simon Flexible speech recognition software
Orca Screen Reader Scriptable screen reader
Julius Two-pass large vocabulary continuous speech recognition engine
Florence Virtual Keyboard Extensible scalable virtual keyboard
Caribou Configurable on screen keyboard with scanning mode
Dasher Graphical predictive text input system
xvkbd Virtual (graphical) keyboard program

Return to our complete collection of Group Tests, identifying the finest Linux software.

Bookmark and Share


Last Updated Sunday, August 10 2014 @ 02:42 PM EDT


We have written a range of guides highlighting excellent free books for popular programming languages. Check out the following guides: C, C++, C#, Java, JavaScript, CoffeeScript, HTML, Python, Ruby, Perl, Haskell, PHP, Lisp, R, Prolog, Scala, Scheme, Forth, SQL, Node.js (new), Fortran (new), Erlang (new), Pascal (new), and Ada (new).


Group Tests
100 Essential Apps
All Group Tests


Top Free Software
5 Office Suites
3 Lean Desktops
7 Document Processors
4 Distraction Free Tools
9 Project Management
4 Business Solutions
9 Groupware Apps
14 File Managers
10 Databases
21 Backup Tools
21 Productivity Tools
5 Note Taking Apps
9 Terminal Emulators
21 Financial Tools
5 Bitcoin Clients
21 Text Editors
21 Video Emulators
21 Home Emulators
42 Graphics Apps
6 CAD Apps
42 Scientific Apps
10 Web Browsers
42 Email Apps
12 Instant Messaging
10 IRC Clients
7 Twitter Clients
12 News Aggregators
11 VoIP Apps
42 Best Games
9 Steam Games
42 Audio Apps
5 Music Streaming
42 Video Apps
5 YouTube Tools
80 Security Apps
9 System Monitoring
8 Geometry Apps
Free Console Apps
14 Multimedia
4 Audio Grabbers
9 Internet Apps
3 HTTP Clients
5 File Managers
Programming
8 Compilers
9 IDEs
9 Debuggers
7 Revision Control Apps
6 Doc Generators
Free Web Software
21 Web CMS
14 Wiki Engines
8 Blog Apps
6 eCommerce Apps
5 Human Resource Apps
10 ERP
10 CRM
6 Data Warehouse Apps
8 Business Intelligence
6 Point-of-Sale

Other Articles
Migrating from Windows
Back up your data
20 Free Linux Books
24 Beginner Books
12 Shell Scripting Books


Older Stories
Monday 03/09
  • Raspberry Pi 2: Raspbian (ARMv6) v Linaro (ARMv7) (0)

  • Friday 03/06
  • Raspberry Pi 2 review (0)

  • Sunday 02/22
  • Chess in a Few Bytes (0)
  • Learn the Art of Computer Programming With These Great Free Beginner Books (2)
  • CD Audio Grabbers (0)

  • Monday 01/19
  • fitlet is a tiny fanless PC full of openness (0)

  • Sunday 01/18
  • MintBox Mini gives Linux users a pocket-sized PC (0)
  • 6 Invaluable Assembly Books (0)

  • Wednesday 01/14
  • Why Mac users donít switch to Linux (0)
  • MIPS Creator CI20 review (0)


  • Vote

    What Linux distribution do you run on your main computer?

    Debian
    Fedora
    Mint
    Slackware
    openSuSE
    Arch
    Ubuntu
    Redhat
    Mageia
    CentOS
    FreeBSD
    Results
    668 votes | 3 comments

    Built with GeekLog and phpBB
    Comments to the webmaster are welcome
    Copyright 2009 LinuxLinks.com - All rights reserved