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Roundup

Roundup

Roundup is a simple-to-use and install issue-tracking system with command-line, web and e-mail interfaces. It is based on the design from Ka-Ping Yee in the Software Carpentry "Track" design competition.

Roundup manages a number of issues (with flexible properties such as "description", "priority", and so on) and provides the ability to: (a) submit new issues, (b) find and edit existing issues, and (c) discuss issues with other participants.

The system will facilitate communication among the participants by managing discussions and notifying interested parties when issues are edited. One of the major design goals for Roundup that it be simple to get going. Roundup is therefore usable "out of the box" with any python 2.3+ (but not 3+) installation. It doesn't even need to be "installed" to be operational, though an install script is provided.

It comes with two issue tracker templates (a classic bug/feature tracker and a minimal skeleton) and four database back-ends (anydbm, sqlite, mysql and postgresql).

 Roundup 1.5.0

Price
Free to download

Size
2.3MB
License

A number of open source licenses

Developer
Richard Jones

Website
roundup.sourceforge.net

System Requirements
Python 2.3 or higher

Optional:
Timezone definitions
RDBMS (SQlite, MySQL, or PostgreSQL)
Xapian full-text indexer
Xapian 1.0.0 or higher
pyopenssl
pyme

Support:
User Guide, Documentation, Wiki, FAQ, SourceForge Project Page, Mailing Lists

Selected Reviews:

Features include:

  • Simple to use
    • Accessible through the web, email, command-line or Python programs
    • Track bugs, features, user feedback, sales opportunities, milestones
    • Automatically keeps a full history of changes to issues with configurable verbosity and easy access to information about who created or last modified any item in the database
    • Issues have their own mini mailing list (nosy list)
    • Users may sign themselves up, there may be automatic signup for incoming email and users may handle their own password reset requests
  • Highly configurable
  • Fast and scalable
    • Database indexes are automatically added for those backends that support them (SQLite, MySQL and PostgreSQL)
  • Simple to install
  • Runs as a daemon process, CGI script[6] or alternatively using mod_python
  • An authorization system, based on roles (of users), classes and objects
  • Web interface:
    • Fully editable interfaces for listing and display of items
    • Extendable to include wizards, parent/meta bug displays
    • Differentiates between anonymous, known and admin users
    • Authentication of user registration and user-driven password resetting using email and one time keys
    • Searching may be performed using many constraints, including a full-text search of messages attached to issues
    • File attachments (added through the web or email) are served up with the correct content-type and filename
    • Email change messages generated by roundup appear to be sent by the person who made the change, but responses will go back through the nosy list by default
    • Flexible access control built around Permissions and Roles with assigned Permissions
    • Generates valid HTML4 or XHTML
    • Detects concurrent user changes
    • Saving and editing of user-defined queries which may optionally be shared with other users

Roundup in action

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Last Updated Sunday, June 01 2014 @ 03:41 AM EDT


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